[theories]
Genius & Madness 20/09/2007
[sourcecode][theories][20/09/2007][ING]

Genius & Madness

How comes this mixture seens to be so common - at least among the geniuses?
The point is to find the common root, and to stop considering this fact a simple coincidence. Perhaps the answer could be found in Bergson's thoeries. The brain - in the philosopher's conception - is not just a reflecting structure, or a machine for meditation and stuff, but it's at the same time a limiting architecture. Someway it's provided by one sort of filter, reducing the amount of perceptive stimulations given by reality and nature itself. In other words, a massive amount of reality would be damageful, so the brain defends itself with this mean, decreasing the power of the single impacts and generally avoiding some to reach itself. This said - and considering that the main damage should be the deterioration of our mind - we could start thinking the "genius" as the ability to perceive more. To get more than the others from the environment we live in. Latent structures, patterns, implicit answers and basical evidences. Matters of improvement. The key to get this bigger amount of "matter" (noumena? Whereas the phenomenons are more common) is a general failure of the bergsonian limiting architecture. It's like the problem of anamnesis. The incorrect work of the system that obliterates precedent lives' memories gives way to the emergency of unknown and unexplainable data to our mind. So, a failure in the limiting complex makes a genius more open to reality. He gets and elaburates more. BUT: the process is dangerous and damageful - so it actually ruins other mind's features. And this makes the mind unsteady. Where you can win something, something else is taken back from you. So other parts of the mind work less, as a result of the damages provoked by reality un-mediated. This could be an answer. A genius is someone who pays for knowledge. It's the way of Faust. Nothing is free, and the balance is always zero. Or negative. This explains also why pain and knowledge often run together.

Diego K. Pierini



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